SEC Creating Searchable Database of Bad Brokers

This is a repost of an article that appeared in ThinkAdvisor today.  Apparently the SEC agrees with one of the main goals of this website; people are increasingly googling the names of people they want to do business with, so information about people who have a documented history of unethical or fraudulent conduct needs to be easier to find.  The only reservation I have about this approach is that the database will be limited to (1) individuals,  and (2) those “who have been barred or suspended as a result of federal securities law violations.”

This leaves a number of gaps.  I think the database should include companies that have a history of fraud (which could include a number of well-known companies), and it should also include companies and individuals who have been barred or suspended by FINRA or state regulatory agencies.  But otherwise its a good first step!  -MWP

SEC Creating Searchable Database of Bad Brokers

The site ‘will be particularly valuable’ for spotting fraudsters who have been stripped of their registrations, Clayton said

 

SEC Chairman Jay Clayton. (Photo: Diego Radzinschi/NLJ)The Securities and Exchange Commission is creating a website that will contain “a searchable database of individuals” who have been barred or suspended as a result of federal securities law violations, the agency’s chairman, Jay Clayton, said Wednesday.

“This resource is intended to make the prior actions of repeat offenders and fraudsters more visible to investors,” Clayton said at the Practising Law Institute’s 49th Annual Institute on Securities Regulation conference in New York.

“Clearly, there are fraudsters in our marketplace who are seemingly unafraid of, or undeterred by, the risk of being caught. The SEC can target the underlying conduct of those fraudsters – and we do – but we also can and should arm investors with information that makes it more difficult for them to be defrauded.”

The searchable website, Clayton continued, “will be particularly valuable when bad actors have shifted from the registered space for investment advisors and broker-dealers to the unregistered space.”

Clayton stated in late September that the agency was planning to compile data on people who are not registered as advisors or brokers in order to catch more incidences of fraud.

During his Wednesday comments, Clayton said that the securities regulator reminds investors “repeatedly that they should conduct a background check before investing with a financial professional, and we are showing them how to do just that” with the upcoming website and with FINRA’s BrokerCheck.

Clayton told audience members that the SEC should continually be asking: “Are there opportunities to deter, mitigate or eliminate wrongdoing before an enforcement action becomes necessary?”

Looking back at enforcement actions brought by the agency, he continued, “a common theme emerges – where opacity exists, bad behavior tends to follow.”

The agency’s enforcement division, he said, “will continue to be active in pursuing cases where hidden or inappropriate fees are at issue, but we also are exploring whether more can be done to clarify fee disclosures made to retail investors and, thereby, deter and reduce the opportunities for misbehavior.”

As an example, he cited firms that invest clients’ money in a mutual fund share class that charges a 12b-1 fee when a lower-cost share class of the same fund is available, “or advisors may improperly choose to use fund assets to pay expenses that should be paid by the firm.”

Customers, he added, “may be deceived if brokers charge fees that are designed to cover the costs of services provided, while also marking up the prices of securities to earn a profit that is not disclosed.”

Barred Broker Hank Brock Pleads Guilty to $10 Million Tax Fraud Scheme

Henry (“Hank”) Brock of St. George, Utah pleaded guilty on Monday to tax evasion, securities fraud and wire fraud. According to the Department of Justice press release, Brock sold fraudulent tax-avoidance and investment strategies to his clients through a financial services company he ran called Mutual Benefit International Group, Ltd.  and through its subsidiaries, Brock Seminars LLC, and MB Holdings BVI, LLC.  The DOJ alleged that as president of Mutual Benefit Brock marketed a fraudulent tax scheme investment called “IRA Exit Strategy” to potential investors through seminars, phone calls, mailings, emails and online ads from 2009 through 2017.

According to the Felony Information that was filed on October 17, 2017, Brock promised investors that this IRA Exit Strategy would help them to avoid paying taxes on IRA withdrawals, which are normally subject to IRS penalties and taxes. Specifically, Brock gave his clients tax forms which falsely showed they were investors in his business, and that the company had incurred substantial losses.  These losses were then used to offset tax liabilities from their IRA withdrawals on fraudulent income tax returns that they were instructed to file with the IRS.

According to the Department of Justice, Brock fraudulently raised over $10.8 million by making false representations to investors regarding this “IRA Exit Strategy,” and by misrepresenting the financial condition of his company and other matters.  On at least one occasion the DOJ alleges Brock transferred $196,323 of a client’s investment funds and used the money for his own personal and business expenses.

Brock faces a maximum sentence of five years in prison for tax evasion, 20 years in prison for securities fraud and 20 years in prison for wire fraud. He will also be ordered to pay restitution and monetary penalties.  Sentencing is scheduled for March 5, 2018 before U.S. District Court Judge Ted Stewart.

This is not the first time that Brock has had run-ins with government regulators.  In April of 2006 he entered into a Stipulation and Consent Order with the Utah Division of Securities, which is obtainable through a government records (GRAMA) request.  As part of  that settlement Brock was barred from associating with a broker-dealer or investment adviser licensed in the State of Utah – for life.

He was also specifically prohibited from “advising individuals in any way regarding the sale, promotion or purchase of securities; and presenting seminars in order to solicit business for, or otherwise make referrals to, for any form of compensation, any broker-dealer, agent, investment adviser or investment representative licensed in Utah.”

It is unclear to me whether Brock violated the terms of his settlement with the state when he solicited investors for Mutual Benefit, but I assume the state is looking into that possibility.

Although this 2006 settlement is no longer available on the Division of Securities’ online database, the fact that Brock has been permanently barred from selling securities is disclosed on FINRA’s website brokercheck.com.  It is always a good idea to run a search on Broker Check before doing business with anyone in the financial services industry.

Mr. Brock is also somewhat infamous for a lawsuit he filed against the Utah Division of Securities in 2010 for $357.6 million.  In the lawsuit he an another man, Jay Rice, accused state regulators of targeting them without proof of wrongdoing in an over-zealous campaign to bring down securities violators. They claimed that they were put out of business and forced to declare bankruptcy as a result of the agency’s actions. “They destroyed my reputation maliciously and wholly without cause,” Mr. Brock said in an interview at the time. “ Among the claims in the lawsuit are allegations that the Securities Division bribed Mr. Rice’s clients, went through Mr. Brock’s computers without permission and sent out a press release announcing the action to bar him from the securities industry that contained false information.

U.S. District Court Judge Tena Campbell initially dismissed the case in July 2010 based on governmental immunity, but then the U.S. 10th Circuit Court of Appeals reversed and remanded just the portion of the case alleging violations of their state constitutional rights.

If you lost money or are facing IRS penalties after working with Hank Brock of Mutual Benefit International Group please share your story in the comments below.

Copyright © 2017 by Mark W. Pugsley. All Rights Reserved.

 

The Financial Fraud Institute is coming to St. George, Utah

STOP FRAUD UTAH and the Financial Fraud Institute are coming to St. George!  The event will take place on November 2nd from 4:00 to 7:00 p.m., at the Dixie Center.  The keynote speaker will be John W. Huber the United States Attorney for the District of Utah. Click on this link to access the brochure.

STOP FRAUD UTAH is a collaboration of federal, state, and local law enforcement and self-regulatory organizations working together to fight fraud in Utah by educating the community about ways to avoid being victimized. What is unique about this program is the depth of cooperation among federal, state, local law enforcement and self-regulatory organizations.  STOP FRAUD UTAH includes the following state and federal agencies:

• The SEC
• The United States Attorney’s Office
• The Commodities Futures Trading Commission
• The FBI
• The IRS
• The Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA)
• Utah Attorney General’s Office
• Utah Division of Securities
• Utah Division of Consumer Protection
• Salt Lake County Attorney’s Office
• Utah County Attorney’s Office
• Washington County Attorney’s Office

Additionally two panels made up of presenters from many of the agencies listed above will discuss financial fraud and consumer fraud. Informational booths from the various agencies, as well as the AARP, Utah Retirement Systems, Adult Protective Services, the Utah Department of Veterans & Military Affairs and the Better Business Bureau will be available to provide information to attendees.

STOP UTAH FRAUD

Arizona Resident Cory Williams Sued for $13 Million Fraud Scheme Targeting LDS Ward Members

Today I received a tip that earlier this year the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) filed a lawsuit in Federal Court in Arizona against Cory Williams and his company Williams Advisory Group of Gilbert, Arizona. In its complaint the CFTC alleged that Mr. Williams defrauded 40 investors out of at least $13 million in connection with a commodity pool he operated in Arizona.

I am interested in this case because Mr. Williams was an active member of the LDS Church and allegedly victimized many church members in Gilbert Arizona where he lives.

The CFTC charged Williams with soliciting $13 million from family members, friends, neighbors and members of his LDS church ward to invest in his commodities trading scheme.  Williams allegedly deposited most of the investors’ money into his personal account and traded futures contracts, but his trading abilities were not as great as he had represented to his investors.  He lost more than $8.3 million in the futures market but continued to tell his investors participants that he was making a profit.

The CFTC alleges that Williams told people that he was an experienced futures trader and that his trading had been consistently profitable, but of course it was not.  Williams sent weekly text messages to his investors reporting fake trading profits as high as $30,000 per week on their investments, but in reality he consistently lost money.  Williams did not have a single profitable month between April 2014 and December 2016.

And as is often the case, Williams also used investor money to fund an extravagant lifestyle; $1.3 million of investor money was diverted to pay for dining, jewelry, vacations and charitable donations such as tithing.

According to James McDonald, Director of CFTC’s Division of Enforcement, “Cory Williams lied to his victims to convince them to invest millions of dollars in his fund. Williams promised to invest their money using his expertise, backed up by a track record of profitable investments. But in reality, Williams simply made up his profitable past, and he spent his victims’ money on himself—using some of it to fund his own dining, travel, and other personal expenses.”

In June the judge in Mr. Williams case froze all of his assets.  Mr. Williams then wrote a letter to the court requesting reconsideration of the preliminary injunction and asking for a stay because he was defending an ongoing criminal investigation.  “I do not have a lawyer for the civil case, and I do not have the money to pay for a lawyer,” Williams said in the June 12 letter to the court, “I have been advised by my criminal lawyer that anything I say in my civil case can be used against me in the criminal investigation.”

The judge nevertheless refused to stay the civil case, and in July of this year the CFTC asked the court to enter a default judgement and order Cory Williams to pay a civil monetary penalty of more than $9.7 million along with restitution in the same amount.  Then on August 28, the CFTC filed a motion for an Order to Show Cause alleging that Williams had violated in the court’s preliminary injunction.  The court has not ruled on either motion.

________________________

So how could these Arizona investors have avoided getting scammed by Brother Williams?

As I discussed in my 2014 article “TOP TEN WAYS TO AVOID LOSING MONEY IN A FINANCIAL SCAM,” it is never a good idea to invest with someone just because they are a friend or a neighbor.  It may seem like doing business with someone you know and trust would be safer, but just because you know and trust the individual soliciting the investment does not mean that the investment itself is good.  You need to do your homework, which in this case would have included asking for trading records and checking with the state and federal regulators to ensure that Mr. Williams had the appropriate licenses.

In 2008 the LDS Church sent a letter to its congregations, urging members to be wary of fraud and warned against “those who use relationships of trust to promote risky or even fraudulent investment and business schemes.”  I’ve been urging people here in Utah to keep church out of investing for years now.  The bottom line is that if someone casually mentions that they used to be the bishop or in some other church position in the context of an investment pitch, watch out!  Church callings and temple worthiness are not relevant to investment decisions.

Copyright © 2017 by Mark W. Pugsley. All Rights Reserved.

Carlos Meza Charged With Defrauding LDS Ward Members

I wanted to share a compelling story of fraud perpetrated against several members of the LDS Church in Illinois.  It was written by Mark Brown of the Chicago Sun Times and tells the story of a man named Carlos Meza who was a bishopric member in his LDS ward in in Crystal Lake, Illinois.

This is not a Utah story per se, but it certainly has familiar themes that we see here; a prominent ward member apparently used his position in the LDS church to gain the trust of fellow church members and then victimized them.

Here is the full text of the story:

These ‘best friends’ aren’t forever

“The people who Carlos Meza allegedly swindled will all tell you how much they liked and trusted him — right up until the point they realized he was never going to return their money.

Meza, 53, of Lake in the Hills, was charged last week in a federal grand jury indictment with defrauding friends and associates out of hundreds of thousands of dollars.

The federal charges follow an unrelated fraud case brought against Meza in December in McHenry County, where he is accused of stealing thousands of dollars from a married couple by claiming to help them refinance their home mortgage and instead pocketing the money.

In both cases, the alleged victims were befriended by Meza through their membership in the Mormon church.

I first told you about Meza three years ago, shortly after he had been charged in Cook County in connection with writing a $45,000 bad check.

I met many of his accusers in court that day, and the most telling moment was when one of them told me: “He said I was his best friend.”

“No, I’m his best friend,” said another.

“No, I’m his best friend,” chimed in a third.

People forget that the con in “con man” is short for confidence.

A good con man relies on gaining the confidence of his victims, then using that trust to trick them into foolish decisions.

Federal authorities say Meza portrayed himself as a “multi-millionaire” businessman who owned multiple properties in Chicago, 100 road construction trucks and had millions of dollars in South America.

All those statements were false, but help explain how Meza was allegedly able to convince “friends” he was doing them a favor by taking their money.

“He told my husband: ‘I’m only doing this for you. Don’t tell anyone else. I don’t do this for everybody,’ ” Linda George, of Algonquin, told me Tuesday.

What Meza did for Tom George was to take $60,000 of his money with the promise of putting it into a low-risk, high-return investment. George withdrew funds from a retirement account in expectation of paying it back promptly and using the windfall to rescue a failing business venture.

Three years ago this month FBI agents met with Tom and Linda George to interview them about their dealings with Meza.

After the meeting, Tom George was so alarmed about the prospect of losing the money he died the next morning of a stress-induced heart attack, his wife said.

“The last thing he said to me was: ‘I need to talk to Carlos,’ ” she said.

Linda George said Meza “definitely used his friendship” from their relationship through the Mormon church to gain her husband’s trust.

Both families attended a Mormon church in Crystal Lake, as did Randy and Linda Stroh, the McHenry County couple who lost their home after Meza told them he had hired people to assist in refinancing their mortgage.

In announcing the charges in that case, Attorney General Lisa Madigan said Meza arranged for the Strohs to write checks to those individuals. Then Meza took the checks, forged signatures and deposited the money in his personal bank accounts, Madigan said.

Meza has pleaded innocent in that case, which is still pending.

In the federal case, Meza is accused of taking at least $95,500 from his victims that he was supposed to invest on their behalf and instead paying his personal debts and expenses.

Meza plea bargained the earlier Cook County felony charge down to a misdemeanor and was sentenced to probation.

Chicago businessman Andrew Lee, the victim in that case, admits Meza capitalized in part on greed and the lure of easy money.

“We all want to win the lottery, right?” Lee said.

It’s the old story that when something sounds too good to be true, it probably is, even if it comes from a trusted “friend.”

If you know Carlos Meza and lost money to this man feel free to share your story below.

Copyright © 2017 by Mark W. Pugsley. All Rights Reserved.

Utah Federal, State, and Local Government Officials Join Forces to Educate Investors on How to Avoid Fraud

Public Seminars to be Held in Salt Lake City and Utah County

SALT LAKE CITY  April 5, 2017 – In a new, collaborative effort, Utah federal, state and local government officials established the Financial Fraud Institute and will hold two separate multi-agency seminars designed to educate Utah investors and consumers on how to recognize and avoid financial and consumer fraud, announced U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission Regional Director Richard R. Best and U.S. Attorney for the District of Utah John W. Huber.  The free seminars are open to the public and will be held in Salt Lake City on April 26 and in Utah County on May 10.

Officials from the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, U.S. Attorney’s Office, Utah Attorney General’s Office, Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA), Utah Division of Securities, U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission, Utah Division of Consumer Protection, FBI, IRS and Salt Lake/Utah County Attorneys offices will participate in the seminars. Utah Attorney General Sean Reyes will be the keynote speaker at the April seminar and Chief Magistrate Judge Paul M. Warner of the U.S. District Court for the District of Utah will be the keynote speaker at the May seminar. These are the first in a series of seminars to be held by representatives of the Financial Fraud Institute.

The seminars will provide information on:  key questions to ask before making investment decisions; where to find free and unbiased information; how to spot financial scams; and how to report suspected fraud.


WHO:      National and local experts from federal and state law enforcement and financial regulatory agencies

WHAT:    Financial Fraud Institute Seminars to educate investors and consumers on how to recognize and avoid fraud.

Salt Lake City

WHEN:                      April 26 in Salt Lake City

                                    5:00 p.m. – 8:30 p.m. See full agenda

WHERE:                   University of Utah, S.J. Quinney College of Law Auditorium

                                    383 S. University St., Salt Lake City, UT 84112

Free parking at the University of Utah Stadium

Utah County

WHEN:                      May 10 in Utah County

                                    5:00 p.m. – 8:30 p.m. See full agenda

WHERE:                   Utah Valley University, Classroom Building Rooms 101B and 101C

                                    800 W. University Parkway, Orem, UT 84058

Those interested in attending the seminars must register at: Salt Lake City and Utah County, or call 801-579-6191. For more information, visit www.utfraud.com.

The seminars are open to the press.  Press interested in attending the events should contact Melodie Rydalch of the Utah U.S. Attorney’s Office on 801-243-6475 or melodie.rydalch@usdoj.gov.

ACCESS THE STOP FRAUD UTAH WEBSITE HERE

Follow us on Twitter at #StopFraudUtah.

 

SEC Publishes Recommendation on How Avoid Common Investment Scams in 2017

The Securities and Exchange Commission has published its annual list of tips designed to help investors with managing their money and avoiding common scams in the New Year.  Here is the list which is published by the SEC’s Office of Investor Education and Advocacy:

SEC INVESTOR BULLETIN: 10 INVESTMENT TIPS FOR 2017

12/27/2016

Whether you are a first-time investor or have been investing for years, here are 10 tips from the SEC’s Office of Investor Education and Advocacy to help you make better informed investment decisions and avoid common scams in 2017.

1. Always check the background of an investment professional—it is easy and free. You can find details of an investment professional’s background and qualifications through the search tool on the SEC’s website for individual investors, Investor.gov.  If you have any questions about checking the background of an investment professional, you can call our toll-free investor assistance line at (800) 732-0330 for help.

2. Promises of high returns with little or no risk are classic warning signs of fraud.  Every investment carries some degree of risk and the potential for greater returns often correlates with greater risk.  Ignore so-called “can’t miss” and “guaranteed risk-free” investment opportunities.  Better yet, report them to the SEC.

3. Be careful when using social media as an investment tool.  Social media and the Internet have become important tools for investors, but also present opportunities for fraudsters to lure investors into a wide range of scams.  For additional information on ways to avoid fraud through social media, please read our bulletin on Social Media and Investing.

4. It can be costly to ignore fees associated with buying, owning, and selling an investment product.  Expenses vary from product to product, and even small differences in costs can mean large differences in earnings over time.  An investment with high costs must perform better than a low-cost investment to generate the same returns.Read our bulletin on How Fees and Expenses Affect Your Investment Portfolio to learn more.

5. Be alert to affinity fraud.  Affinity frauds target members of identifiable groups, such as the elderly, religious or ethnic communities, or the military.  Even if you know the person making the investment offer, be sure to check out the investment and the person’s background—no matter how trustworthy the person seems.

6. Any offer or sale of securities must be either registered with the SEC or exempt from registration.  Otherwise, it is illegal.  Registration is important because it provides investors access to key information about the company’s management, products, services, and finances. Always check whether an offering is registered with the SEC by using the SEC’s EDGAR database or contacting the SEC’s toll-free investor assistance line at (800) 732-0330.

7. Diversification can help reduce the overall risk of an investment portfolio.  By picking the right mix of investments, you may be able to limit your losses and reduce the fluctuations of your investment returns without sacrificing too much in potential gains.  Some investors find that it is easier to achieve diversification through ownership of mutual funds or exchange-traded funds rather than through ownership of individual stocks or bonds.

8. Did you know that active trading and some other very common investing behaviors actually can undermine investment performance? According to researchers, other common investing mistakes include focusing on past performance, favoring investments from your own country, region, state, or company, and holding on to losing investments too long and selling winning investments too soon.

9. If you are investing or saving toward a goal, or just want to learn about how your money can grow under various hypothetical scenarios, take advantage of our compound interest and savings goal calculators.These calculators are great tools to help inform any decisions you make about your investing and saving.

10. Unbiased resources are available to help you make informed investing decisions. Whether checking the background of an investment professional, researching an investment, or learning about new products or scams, unbiased information can be a significant advantage for investing wisely.  A great starting point is Investor.gov.

If you have questions about your investments, your investment account or a financial professional, don’t hesitate to contact the SEC’s Office of Investor Education and Advocacy online or on our toll-free investor assistance line at (800) 732-0330.


The Office of Investor Education and Advocacy has provided this information as a service to investors.  It is neither a legal interpretation nor a statement of SEC policy.  If you have questions concerning the meaning or application of a particular law or rule, please consult with an attorney who specializes in securities law.

Confessed Fraudster Thomas Andrews Has Been Sentenced to 97 Months in Prison

As a follow-up to my prior story about a shocking small town fraud scheme that occurred in Nephi, Utah.  Yesterday the confessed perpetrator of that scheme, Tom Andrews, was sentenced to 97 months in prison.  This is the maximum sentence Judge Sam could have imposed. Hopefully others who might consider starting up a scheme like this will think twice when they see this significant prison sentence. This story about the sentencing appeared in the Deseret News today:

Judge comes down hard on former Nephi man in affinity fraud case

SALT LAKE CITY — A Sanpete County dairy owner told a federal judge Thursday that he’d be happy to have the man who stole his retirement money do some time on his farm.

Bob Bown said Tom Andrews needs to do some physical labor, get his hands dirty, rake manure out of stalls. “One of the best things that could happen to him is to do some hard work,” Bown said.

U.S. District Judge David Sam agreed thprison_mainat it would be “wonderful” if Andrews could “get some calluses to earn a buck,” but federal rules prevented him from imposing such a penalty.

The judge, however, sentenced Andrews to 97 months in prison — the maximum under sentencing guidelines — after the former Nephi man admitted to securities fraud and mail fraud. Sam, who rejected an earlier plea deal as too lenient, said he would have ordered a longer prison term if he could. Sam also ordered him to pay $8.3 million in restitution.

Sam then made the rare move for a white-collar case of placing Andrews, 40, in custody on the spot. A couple dozen of the victims applauded as U.S. marshals escorted Andrews from the courtroom in handcuffs.

“It just makes me sad,” Sam said, noting how Andrews wiped out people’s retirement savings. “It’s kind of like taking the widow’s mite.”

Andrews, who ran a Nephi tax return preparation service, admitted to encouraging nearly two dozen people to roll over their retirement accounts into fake companies he created called Jackson Trust and Lincoln Financial Group. He mailed them doctored financial statements from California to make the companies appear legitimate.

Andrews used at least $5.5 million for his living expenses and personal benefit, including luxury cars, homes and vacations. Investigators say all the money is gone. Victims — many of them longtime friends whom Andrews considered family — don’t expect to ever recoup their losses.

“He has lived as a millionaire for years and everybody else is paying for that now,” victim Ben Rosenloff told the judge.

It was also revealed in court Thursday that Andrews failed to remit some of his clients’ federal and state tax payments, landing them in trouble with the IRS.

“I don’t understand him,” Bown said. “I thought I knew him, but I don’t.”

Prosecutor Jacob Strain said this case wasn’t like other investment fraud cases where investors hope to double their money in a get-rich-quick scheme. These were people who knew and trusted Andrews and who thought their money was safe and secure with him, he said.

Andrews read an apology to the victims, saying words can’t describe his regret and that he hopes people forgive him.

“I’ve hurt and destroyed people’s lives and I’m truly sorry for that,” he said. “I scarred them both emotionally and financially for years to come.”

Defense attorney Rebecca Skordas argued for a 70-month sentence because she said Andrews was “incredibly forthcoming when originally confronted about wrongdoing” — a statement that drew scoffs from the packed courtroom.

Andrews cooperated with federal investigators and helped them go through bank documents to determine how much money victims were owed, she said.

Mike Sperry, who said his parents lost their life savings, showed the judge a large poster with photos of Andrews, who moved to California, enjoying himself at Disneyland this fall.

“I don’t think any of the victims have been to Disneyland since this happened,” he said.

Sallie Rawlings, a Draper lawyer who along with her husband lost 30 years of retirement savings, suggested Andrews be required to write an apology letter to the 20 victims listed in the criminal charges and spend a year in prison for each of them, an idea the judge said he liked but he couldn’t do.

“This was a calculated and manipulated fraud perpetrated by a masterful thief,” Rawlings said. “Let’s send a message that this cowardly, cruel, brazen act will not be tolerated.”

UPDATE: The Shocking Story of A Small Town Fraud

UPDATE: Yesterday United States District Judge David Sam rejected a plea deal that had been worked out between Thomas Andrews (the subject of the story below) and the U.S. Attorney’s Office.  According to a story in the Deseret News, Judge Sam rejected the plea deal because he believed it was too lenient.  Andrews withdrew his guilty plea and his attorney, Rebecca Skordas, told Judge David Sam that she would continue negotiations with prosecutors.

In rejecting the plea Judge Sam said he was very concerned about the statements he had received from victims, including one that said the financial loss reduced them to eating “eggs, pancakes and beans.” The judge said he couldn’t imagine someone taking advantage of their friends and neighbors “to just diminish them to point where they can’t hardly live day to day.”  “It’s absolutely unbelievable that someone would conduct themselves in that way,” Sam said.

Prosecutors had recommended that Andrews spend 48 to 60 months in prison after he agreed to plead guilty to securities fraud and mail fraud in June.  In rejecting that deal Judge Sam noted the sentence was below the federal guidelines, which was calculated as 78 to 97 months in prison.  Andrews’ accomplice Scott Christensen also pleaded guilty and was sentenced to a year and a day in prison.

Stay tuned for more details.


I typically write about lawsuits filed by the SEC, but this time I wanted to write about a civil case that was filed by a number of the victims of a Nephi man named Thomas E. Andrews.  The information in this story comes primarily from allegations that were made in a civil complaint by my friends over at Parr Brown, who filed their case in Juab County in November of 2015 (Civil Case No. 150600025).  I will be filing a separate lawsuit involving these same facts shortly as discussed at the bottom of this post.

NephiTom Andrews grew up in Juab County, Utah, and was known to most of the victims in the case since he was a small kid.  Most of the victims in this case are residents of Nephi, Utah and knew Andrews and his family through their community and their common membership in the LDS Church.

The victims are not sophisticated in financial matters, and so they had the utmost faith and confidence in Tom and his father, Earl Andrews, who was a respected CPA in the community.  Earl prepared tax returns for  the victims and assisted them with their financial matter for many years before he was sentenced to prison in approximately 2005 for an unrelated reason.  When his father went to prison Tom took over his father’s role as tax preparer for the victims and began preparing tax returns for them, although it turns out he was never licensed by the State of Utah to do so.

At about the same time he took over his father’s tax practice, Tom obtained his license to sell financial products and joined LPL Financial as a stock broker, and Gary York.  he then began to solicit investments from the people whose tax returns he was preparing.  Over time the victims began to rely on Tom for investment and retirement advice, as well as for their tax preparation.  They opened investment accounts with LPL through Tom Andrews and placed some or all of the their retirement funds into his hands.

But beginning in 2011 Tom Andrews began to make other plans for their money.

Andrews formed a fake trust named which he called the “Jackson Living Trust” and made himself as Trustee. Andrews then opened a bank account at Cyprus Credit Union under the name of the “Jackson” or the “The Jackson Living Trust.”  It is unclear what paperwork he presented to the credit union, but they nevertheless opened up an account for this fake trust and gave Tom the full signatory authority as the trustee.  This meant that he could cash or deposit checks that were made out to the “Jackson Trust.”

At about the same time, Tom began counseling his clients to invest in an annuity with Jackson National (which does actually exist).  He told them that this investment would pay a guaranteed rate of return between 5 percent and 8 percent annually.  Critically, he advised them to liquidate most or all of their investments held at LPL, or wherever else, and to put the money into this annuity.  This was terrible investment advice; it reduced their diversification and in some cases exposed them to early termination fees and/or tax penalties, but the victims trusted Tom and did what he advised.

Andrews provided real marketing materials from Jackson National Life and even used the company’s application forms.  The victims filled out the applications, and gave Andrews checks for their entire life savings made out to “Jackson Trust” which they believed would be invested in the Jackson National Life annuities.  But the money was never sent to Jackson National Life.

He deposited each of the checks into his fake account at the Cyprus Credit Union and then use the funds as he saw fit.  He basically stole the money.  How much money did he steal?  Over $9 million.

But the victims needed to continue to believe that their money was safe and secure in the annuity they thought they had purchased so Andrews generated fake quarterly statements for them.  He pulled a Jackson logo off the internet  and made up fake account statements that he mailed out to all of his clients. Of course the fake statements showed that their investment was safe and growing as Andrews had promised.

Discovery of the Fraud

In October of 2015, several of his clients became suspicious when they had a hard time withdrawing money from their accounts.  Several contacted Jackson National Life and learned that in fact they had no account with the firm, and the account statements they had received were fake.

Andrews apparently got wind of the problem and disappeared, but has now hired an attorney and is defending the case.  The location of the $9 million of investor money he took is unclear, but I wouldn’t be surprised if he used it to trade commodities, options, currencies or some other high-risk strategy thinking he could generate big returns and the investors would never know the difference.   Time will tell.

But if these allegations are true, there are several troubling aspects of this story.  First, unlike many of the stories I’ve written about, this one it appears to be a deliberate fraud from the outset.  Mr. Andrews set up the bank accounts and with a name that was deliberately similar to the name of a well-known annuity company.   He used marketing materials and account applications for a real investment, and his investors would not have known that their money was going into a personal bank account as opposed to a licensed, verifiable company.   Yes, he used church and family connections to gain their trust, but the investment itself appeared legitimate.

Another troubling aspect of this story is that there are a number of financial institutions who appear to have dropped the ball and did not implement oversight and compliance procedures that could have protected the interests of the victims in this case.  Banks, brokerage firms and others should be watching for red flags and alerting state and federal authorities when they see suspicious activity.  In this case that oversight never happened, and millions of dollars were lost as a result.

On February 12, 2106 FINRA barred Tom Andrews from associating with any brokerage firm in any capacity, and I suspect the SEC and/or DOJ will be filing cases against him soon.

The Juab County lawsuit  is currently pending.


Our firm has been retained by many of the victims in this case to pursue a case against Mr. Andrews’ brokerage firm, LPL Financial.  If you or someone you know was involved in this case in any way please contact me at 801-323-3380, or by email.   -Mark Pugsley

Copyright © 2016 by Mark W. Pugsley.  All rights reserved.

The Deseret News’ Three Part Series on Affinity Fraud in Utah

hotspotsMy friend Dennis Romboy is a great reporter over at the Deseret News who put together a very detailed two-part story on affinity fraud that was published over the weekend.

Part One of the series was called “Utah’s fraud ‘epidemic’: Victims share anger, embarrassment, hurt” and provided the details of how a number of Utahn’s have been victimized by individuals in their community.  Here are some interesting takeaways from the article:

  • FBI supervisory special agent Mike Pickett, who heads the white-collar unit in the Salt Lake field office, estimates the annual dollar amount of fraud in Utah now exceeds $2 billion.
  • Utah Attorney General said affinity fraud is “rampant” in Utah. He has also used the word “epidemic” to describe what’s happening in the state, and that is despite aggressive efforts to prosecute criminals and educate an unsuspecting public.
  • So far in 2016, federal criminal fraud cases have totaled $59.3 million in losses, according to the U.S. Attorney’s Office.
  • Utah is in the top five in terms of investigations, indictments, prosecutions and sentences for investment fraud.

A number of the individuals featured in this story are victims of the Thomas Andrews scam that was detailed in my prior post called “A Shocking Story of A Small Town Fraud.”  I applaud these individuals for their bravery in publicly talking about what happened to them in the hope that some people will read the story and avoid making the same mistakes.

Part Two of the series was about how to protect yourself from being defrauded.  The article lists a number of ways to protect yourself, including the following “Red flag warnings of fraud”:

  • If it sounds too good to be true, it is.
  • Guaranteed returns aren’t. Every investment carries some risk.
  • Beauty isn’t everything. Don’t be fooled by slick websites.
  • Pressure to send money RIGHT NOW.

The article quotes me a number of times, including “Pugsley has succinct advice for anyone who receives an offer that mentions religion. ‘If someone brings up the church in the context of an investment pitch, then that’s the end of the discussion and you leave the room because people try to conflate the two,’ Pugsley said. ‘There should be no connection between the church and investments. Period.'”

To round it all up the Editorial Board of the newspaper published an opinion on the need to “trust but verify” that I thought was worth reproducing here:

In our opinion: Utah must ‘be trusting but verify’ regarding affinity fraud

The bucolic land of eastern Ohio is home to sizable pockets of the Amish community. Known for their collective ethos, these tight-knit religious cooperatives thrive on high levels of trust and social cohesion. Yet, the same trust that produces a remarkable culture of burden sharing can be exploited to perpetrate fraud.

In 2012, Monroe L. Beachy, a trusted name within the Amish community, was sent to prison for orchestrating a scheme that defrauded some 2,700 investors, many of them friends and neighbors.

Of course, the Amish are hardly the only religious group that’s vulnerable. As the Deseret News reported in a two-part series this week on affinity fraud: “Bernie Maddoff’s $20 billion fraud targeted wealthy Jewish people in Florida and Israel. Allen Stanford went after Southern Baptists before his $7 billion empire fell.” And, according to the Economist, the state with the most affinity fraud per capita is thought to be Utah, where members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints comprise some 60 percent of the population.

The common theme is communities with high levels of trust are particularly vulnerable to fraud. The solution then is a heightened scrutiny when mixing financial and religious relationship. Although there is unquestionably a role to play for government in preventing and punishing fraud, individual consumers must also take responsibility for how they spend their money.

As Utah Governor Gary Herbert told the Economist: “be trusting but verify.”

There are a variety of things consumers can do to fortify against potential affinity fraud. As noted, for starters individuals can exercise healthy dubiety, especially when an opportunity sounds too good to be true (spoiler: it probably is). Yet, this is easier said than done. The most effective schemes, for example, do not make extravagant claims. Bernie Maddoff was so successful because his “returns” were relatively modest, making his fraud more convincing.

As with Maddoff’s victims, in Utah there are many highly educated and discerning individuals who have been taken in. Thus, it’s important to look beyond the facade of an investment company to determine its validity, and be doubly cautious about mixing church and financial relationships. There is no substitute for doing your homework instead of relying on the word of someone you trust in other settings. Keeping these principles in mind can protect consumers from deceitful investment opportunities claimed by people they know.

There have always been those who seek gain at the cost of others. Yet, in a hyper-competitive economy with strong cultural status expectations, a heightened temptation may exist to cut corners and profit at the expense of others. In such an environment, it’s incumbent on individuals of sound mind — as well as governments and community leaders — to guard against fraud.

After all, without willing investors, affinity fraud is impossible.

Copyright © 2016 by Mark W. Pugsley.  All rights reserved.