Arizona Resident Cory Williams Sued for $13 Million Fraud Scheme Targeting LDS Ward Members

Today I received a tip that earlier this year the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) filed a lawsuit in Federal Court in Arizona against Cory Williams and his company Williams Advisory Group of Gilbert, Arizona. In its complaint the CFTC alleged that Mr. Williams defrauded 40 investors out of at least $13 million in connection with a commodity pool he operated in Arizona.

I am interested in this case because Mr. Williams was an active member of the LDS Church and allegedly victimized many church members in Gilbert Arizona where he lives.

The CFTC charged Williams with soliciting $13 million from family members, friends, neighbors and members of his LDS church ward to invest in his commodities trading scheme.  Williams allegedly deposited most of the investors’ money into his personal account and traded futures contracts, but his trading abilities were not as great as he had represented to his investors.  He lost more than $8.3 million in the futures market but continued to tell his investors participants that he was making a profit.

The CFTC alleges that Williams told people that he was an experienced futures trader and that his trading had been consistently profitable, but of course it was not.  Williams sent weekly text messages to his investors reporting fake trading profits as high as $30,000 per week on their investments, but in reality he consistently lost money.  Williams did not have a single profitable month between April 2014 and December 2016.

And as is often the case, Williams also used investor money to fund an extravagant lifestyle; $1.3 million of investor money was diverted to pay for dining, jewelry, vacations and charitable donations such as tithing.

According to James McDonald, Director of CFTC’s Division of Enforcement, “Cory Williams lied to his victims to convince them to invest millions of dollars in his fund. Williams promised to invest their money using his expertise, backed up by a track record of profitable investments. But in reality, Williams simply made up his profitable past, and he spent his victims’ money on himself—using some of it to fund his own dining, travel, and other personal expenses.”

In June the judge in Mr. Williams case froze all of his assets.  Mr. Williams then wrote a letter to the court requesting reconsideration of the preliminary injunction and asking for a stay because he was defending an ongoing criminal investigation.  “I do not have a lawyer for the civil case, and I do not have the money to pay for a lawyer,” Williams said in the June 12 letter to the court, “I have been advised by my criminal lawyer that anything I say in my civil case can be used against me in the criminal investigation.”

The judge nevertheless refused to stay the civil case, and in July of this year the CFTC asked the court to enter a default judgement and order Cory Williams to pay a civil monetary penalty of more than $9.7 million along with restitution in the same amount.  Then on August 28, the CFTC filed a motion for an Order to Show Cause alleging that Williams had violated in the court’s preliminary injunction.  The court has not ruled on either motion.

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So how could these Arizona investors have avoided getting scammed by Brother Williams?

As I discussed in my 2014 article “TOP TEN WAYS TO AVOID LOSING MONEY IN A FINANCIAL SCAM,” it is never a good idea to invest with someone just because they are a friend or a neighbor.  It may seem like doing business with someone you know and trust would be safer, but just because you know and trust the individual soliciting the investment does not mean that the investment itself is good.  You need to do your homework, which in this case would have included asking for trading records and checking with the state and federal regulators to ensure that Mr. Williams had the appropriate licenses.

In 2008 the LDS Church sent a letter to its congregations, urging members to be wary of fraud and warned against “those who use relationships of trust to promote risky or even fraudulent investment and business schemes.”  I’ve been urging people here in Utah to keep church out of investing for years now.  The bottom line is that if someone casually mentions that they used to be the bishop or in some other church position in the context of an investment pitch, watch out!  Church callings and temple worthiness are not relevant to investment decisions.

Copyright © 2017 by Mark W. Pugsley. All Rights Reserved.