More Trouble for John Zane Jeppesen of Garland, Utah

I have previously  written about Mr. Jeppeson, now his is more trouble.  This is from the Ogden Herald Journal this week:

The Utah Division of Securities of the Department of Commerce have filed court documents against John Zane Jeppesen, of Garland, bringing forth more accusations and details into Jeppesen’s nearly 20 year behavior of securities fraud and outlining a series of investments that have totaled nearly $9 million while naming family members of Jeppesen’s as recipients of those investment funds.

The Utah Division of Securities recently filed three different reports against Jeppesen: a Stipulation and Consent Order, an Order of Adjudication and a Findings of Fact, Conclusions of Law and Recommended Order, all highlighting Jeppesen’s pattern of securities fraud from six different investors starting in 2010 while adding two other incidents that left many Box Elder County residents out of millions of dollars.

According to these documents, the Division determined that Jeppesen, with Jeppesen Land and Properties, are subject to a $300,000 fine. In the stipulation and consent order, it states that JLP is a business entity that was incorporated in Feb. 2011, and is currently an active entity registered with the Utah Division of Corporations with LaDene M. Jeppesen, 92, (Jeppesen’s mother), listed as the registered agent and manager. Jeppesen Land and Properties has never been registered with the Division as an issuer of securities and found no records showing securities registration, exemption from registration or notice filing in any manner for JLP, according to these documents.

Breaking down the timeline of Jeppesen’s fraudulent investment behavior, the Division outlined three separate time frames that go back as far as 1999.

According to these documents, in 1999 Jeppesen acknowledged in an Idaho order that he was not licensed to sell securities under Idaho code but violated that code by selling securities that were unregistered. He also violated Idaho code by making untrue statements of material facts, and omitted facts to investors by failing to disclose to them that the promissory notes he was selling were not registered as securities and that he did not have a license to sell securities.

Jeppesen took this pattern of unlawful activity to Utah and in 2005 entered into a similar order with Utah and the Division for similar charges. In this series of events, court documents state, “Jeppesen deceived 134 Utah investors and raised approximate $8 million. For his unlawful services, Jeppesen received a total of $986,563 in compensation.” Many of those Utah investors were Box Elder County residents.

In a 2007 Utah order, Jeppesen was told he “would not engage in the sale of unregistered securities in the state of Utah” and that he would become a licensed broker dealer, investment adviser of agent before the Division before engaging in any securities transactions. Jeppesen was also told he was prohibited from making any untrue statements or omitting facts and that he would tell potential investors the existence of his current stipulation.

In 2010, Jeppesen violated the securities laws in a third round of securities violations. In this round of violations, according to court documents, Jeppesen worked with six investors in both Utah and Idaho.

Investors 1 and 2 are residents of Idaho with family and business ties to Utah. They met Jeppesen through a family member that previously invested with him in a different venture. Jeppesen collected $100,000 from these investors (over the course of a year), returned approximately $25,770, promising a 12 percent return on property located in Utah County.

According to the Stipulation and Consent Order, Jeppesen “used these funds in a manner inconsistent with what he told Investor 1 and Investor 2,” and instead used $5,225 towards banks and credit cards, $18,720 for payments to earlier investors, $530 to LaDene Jeppesen and $2,500 to his wife, Robyn Jeppesen. According to this document, Jeppesen told these investors “there was no way to lose money on this deal.”

Investors 3 and 4, a married couple from Salt Lake County, also met Jeppesen through a family member that invested with him previously. This couple invested five different times with Jeppesen for a total of $135,000 and are still owed the full amount in principal alone.

The document states that Jeppesen did not provide these investors with a promissory note or trust deed at the time of investment and when asked, Jeppesen claimed, “he forgot to record the trust deed and create a note.” These investors were told that they would be paid back within one year.

In this case, Jeppesen told investors, “There was no need for a promissory note or trust deed because it is a short-term investment and they have to move fast.” Instead, the Division stated, Jeppesen used these funds in a manner inconsistent with what he told these investors with payments to earlier investors of $24,130, a payment of $4,357 to banks and credit cards and over $4,000 to various businesses.

The Division also states that Jeppesen used those funds paying Robyn Jeppesen $11,532, Shannon Fitzgerald (wife of Michael Fitzgerald) $10,336, $5,000 to Lone Peak Real Estate and $2,200 in payments to earlier investors.

Investor 5 is a resident of Davis County and was told by Jeppesen that “he could not wait for a bank loan” and that his investment would be a trust deed. Jeppesen also told Investor 5 that “he was working with Mike Fitzgerald, his business partner on several land deals” and that Fitzgerald was “a genius with land deals.” Investor 5 was told that Jeppesen and Fitzgerald wouldn’t need 45 days to return his funds because they had property in Beverly Hills, California that was under contract that would sell within 30 days.

Investor 5 was also told that he could foreclose on the property if Jeppesen or Fitzgerald didn’t return his funds in 45 days. This investor wired $100,000 to JLP in Feb. 2012. One month later Jeppesen told Investor 5 that he would not be able to return the funds within the promised 45 days because “of an issue with the closing on the Beverly Hills property.”

Jeppesen offered Investor 5 an extra 1 percent interest on top of the guaranteed 20 percent if Investor 5 agreed to keep his funds with Jeppesen and not foreclose on the property but the investor declined the offer.

To this date, Investor 5 is still owed $100,000 in principal alone and that the investment monies were used by Jeppesen in a manner inconsistent with what the investor was told.

Instead, the funds were used to make payments to earlier investors in the amount of $53,556, $16,571 to a credit card, $11,113 to Robyn Jeppesen, $6,500 to Shannon Fitzgerald, $5,425 to Carole Jeppesen (Jeppesen’s sister in law), $2,625 transferred to other bank accounts, $1,665 to Best Buy, $1,500 transferred to himself, $530 transferred to LaDene Jeppesen and other transactions all totaling $100,000.

According to documents, Jeppesen used Investor 6’s funds in a manner inconsistent with what Jeppesen told him including, $79,045 in payments to earlier investors, $49,881 in credit card payments, $22,475 to Robyn Jeppesen, $19,841 to Shannon Fitzgerald, $12,711 in transfers to other bank accounts, $21,465 to Utah County Treasurer, $5,447 for remodeling, $2,650 to LaDene Jeppesen, $4,969 in unknown expenses and various other transactions totaling $220,000.

During Jeppesen’s May 24, 2018, hearing, he presented two arguments. “First, Jeppesen asserted that he thought that he had not violated the securities laws this third time because he had obtained a business license for his new enterprise and because he had secured the investment of the investors by security interests in real property. Secondly, he asserted that his investors would not be harmed because the value of the properties involved in the investment exceeded the total amount owed to the investors, documents state.

Although the first argument is unrelated to the fine imposed on Jeppesen, the Division states that he did not consult with a knowledgeable securities attorney to assure that the investments weren’t in violation of securities laws. Instead, Jeppesen said he “relied on the advice of two non-attorneys, one of whom was a Mr. Fitzgerald who had been Jeppesen’s accomplice in the $8 million securities fraud transaction that was the subject of the 2007 Utah Order,” documents state.

“Jeppesen’s testimony that he was now complying with securities laws, or thought that he was complying with securities laws, is inherently and clearly not to be believed,” court documents state. The Division added that there was no documented credible evidence produced at that hearing that said investors had security interest in real property.

Countering Jeppesen’s claim that his investors weren’t harmed in a substantial way, “First and foremost, is the fact that the parties acknowledge and agree that the investors in the present third round of securities fraud are currently owed $488,830 in principal alone. These investors are currently harmed in a substantial way,” the document states.

Jeppesen also stated during that hearing that “the properties that could be sold to make payment to the investors were not presently owned by him or the Respondent entity, but by the Jeppesen family members,” it added. He added that one of the properties had already been sold but the sales proceeds from the transaction were “tied up in escrow” and subject to multiple claims.

“No credible evidence was given that even one dollar of the present or prospective sales proceeds from these properties would ever pass into the hands of the harmed investors,” the document stated.

The Division added that Jeppesen provided no cooperation to their investigation and that “the Respondents have transferred to Jeppesen family members the real properties that were meant to respond to, or secure, the investments of the victims of the Respondents.”

On April 4, 2016, Jeppesen was charged in Utah’s Third District Court in Salt Lake City with 11 counts of securities fraud, two counts of theft and one count of pattern of unlawful activity, all second-degree felonies. On July 7, 2017, Jeppesen entered into a plea deal with the state and plead guilty to one count of pattern of unlawful activity and the remaining charges were dismissed.

On Dec. 8, 2017, Jeppesen was sentenced to one to 15 years in the Utah State Prison but the term was suspended. Instead, he was sentenced to 30 days in jail, which he served. Jeppesen was also ordered by the judge to pay restitution to the investors in the previously mentioned cases in the amount of $488,830. If he fails to make the payments to investors he may be sentenced to addition time in jail and/or prison.

John Zane Jeppesen of Garland, Utah And His History of Fraud 

John Zane Jeppesen of Garland, Utah is probably not someone you want to invest your money with.

  • In 1999, Jeppesen entered into an agreement with the Idaho Securities Bureau, under which he admitted to violations of registration, licensing and anti-fraud provisions and was ordered to pay outstanding principal and interest to Idaho investors.
  • In 2003 Lehman Brothers Bank filed a $58 million dollar lawsuit against Jeppesen’s company Beverly Hills Development and others in California alleging it was involved in a massive real estate loan fraud scheme occurring over a three-year period through forgery, identity theft, misrepresentations, fraudulent loan documents, wire fraud, and the illegal laundering of funds.
  • In 2005 the Utah Division of Securities charged Jeppesen with raising approximately $8 million dollars for a company called Beverly Hills Development Corporation from 134 Utah investors though unsecured promissory notes. He settled that case, but the conduct didn’t stop.
  • In April of 2016 he was charged by state prosecutors in the Attorney General’s office with 11 criminal counts including securities fraud, theft and one count of pattern of unlawful activity for running a real estate scheme.
  • In September of 2016 the Utah Division of Securities filed another Order to Show Cause against him that included 8 causes of action including securities fraud, unlicensed selling of securities and “willful violation” of the prior 2005 Consent Order with the Division involving strikingly similar conduct.

Despite all that history of fraudulent activity, much of which he admitted, Third District Court Judge Royal Hansen sentenced Jeppesen to just 30 days in jail after he pled guilty to one count of felony pattern of unlawful activity.  Presumably when he gets out of prison he will start paying back his investors, and in fact Just Hansen stated that was his intent in keeping the sentence reasonably short. When Jeppesen’s 30 days is served, he has six months to pay back the victims or he’ll return to jail to serve 11 more months.  Hopefully that will provide the necessary incentive to get everyone repaid!

As detailed in the Tremonton Leader, Jeppesen originally faced eleven counts of securities fraud, two counts of theft and one count of patterns of unlawful activity, all second degree felonies as a result of his alleged role in a real estate investment scheme that has left six known victims out of hundreds of thousands of dollars.  The linked articles by reporter Cari Doutre in the Tremonton Leader contain a lot of great detail about his conduct, and the heartbreaking testimony from his victims at the sentencing hearing.

I will interested to see whether he will be able to get his victims repaid after he gets out of prison. If you are a victim of one of Mr. Jeppeson’s scams please share your story in the comments below.

Copyright © 2018 by Mark W. Pugsley.  All rights reserved.