Another Scam Comes to Light: Future Income Payments or FIP

Editor’s Note: I have been contacted by a number of individuals who invested in Future Income Payments or FIP through Utah-based Live Abundant, which is referenced in the article below.  This article appeared in the Wall Street Journal today and has a pretty good summary of the FIP situation.  Spoiler alert: it’s not good.

Private Pension Product, Sold by Felon, Wipes Investors Out

Investors accuse Future Income Payments of taking them for more than $100 million

By Jean Eaglesham of the Wall Street Journal – July 23, 2018 5:30 a.m. ET

Mr. Kohn’s company, Future Income Payments, appears shut, according to court filings. His investors are likely to be wiped out, according to lawyers representing them, who plan to sue scores of firms that sold Future Income products as soon as this week. At least 25 states have taken enforcement actions or are investigating the company, it said in April.

The blow-up shines a light on the boom in opaque private markets, to which investors have flocked in the hope of doing better than they can in traditional stock and bond markets.

Private-market products, including the ones offered by Future Income, are frequently sold by financial advisers. Sales targets are often retirees looking to beat the anemic returns on bonds and other savings products.

Future Income essentially sold investors other people’s pensions. Mr. Kohn’s firm would find workers entitled to pension payments and temporarily buy the rights to those payments—effectively lending the beneficiaries money against their future pension income in what is called a “pension advance.” Then, Future Income would sell the rights to investors for a lump sum. An investor might put up $100,000 in exchange for an income of 7% for five years, for example.

But Future Income’s apparent collapse has left investors stranded. The company is no longer collecting the pension money that funds its own payments to investors, according to court documents. Mr. Kohn couldn’t be reached for comment. It isn’t clear if he has a lawyer.

JC and Mary Barb at home in Hemet, Calif. Mr. Barb says that money they invested ‘was to be a big help to us in our retirement and now it’s not there, it’s gone.’
JC and Mary Barb of Hemet, Calif., say their financial adviser Kevin Kraemer persuaded them to invest some $78,000 with Future Income last year. “He came to us and said, ‘Hey we can make some more money on your money,’ [and] sold us this new deal,” said Mrs. Barb, a 66-year-old retired postal worker. Her husband, a 63-year-old retired teacher, said the money “was to be a big help to us in our retirement and now it’s not there, it’s gone.” Mr. Kraemer declined to comment.

Unlike publicly traded investments, there are few rules on how pension advances can be sold or by whom. “They illustrate the problems with the financial services industry selling opaque, high-commission private investments,” says Joe Peiffer, a New Orleans-based plaintiffs’ lawyer representing some purchasers of Future Income’s products. “We have clients who were advised to cash in their pensions and refinance their homes to buy these things.”

In a letter sent to investors in April, Mr. Kohn said his company was suffering from “intense regulatory pressure and legal expense,” and investors had been told there were “no guarantees [they] would receive all payments.” Future Income didn’t respond to emails, and its phones appear to be down. Christopher Jones, a lawyer representing the company over a civil investigation by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, didn’t respond to requests for comment. The CFPB declined to comment.

Future Income called itself “America’s largest pension cash-flow originator,” boasting of a “global footprint of over 200 employees.” Its mailing address is a mailbox at a United Parcel Service Inc. store in a strip mall outside Las Vegas. The same address has been used by Mr. Kohn for dozens of other companies, most of them now defunct, state records show.

Mr. Kohn formed Future Income in 2011, company records show. In 2016, he set up a separate company, FIP LLC, controlled via a Philippines-based corporation of which he is the sole owner, according to a complaint filed last year by Minnesota regulators. He pleaded guilty to trafficking in counterfeit goods in 2006 and served 15 months in federal prison.

State regulators took action against Future Income as early as 2014 over the terms on which it was buying pension benefits, saying the firm was lending illegally. Some states said the company was breaching state laws limiting the interest that can be charged on loans. A disabled Gulf War veteran who borrowed $2,700 was required to send $450 a month from his benefits for five years—a total of $27,000, or an annual percentage rate of 200%, according to one example cited in the Minnesota lawsuit. Mr. Kohn in his April letter said the company was in the process of agreeing, or had agreed to, settlements with the states that limited the amounts it could collect.

“Future Income Payments’ illegal loans were outrageously expensive,” said Lisa Madigan, the Illinois attorney general, who filed a suit against the firm on the same grounds this year.

The string of regulatory actions didn’t stop advisory firms and others selling the commission-rich products, many as part of a retirement-savings strategy. A Future Income marketing presentation urged retirees to “give your savings the opportunity to grow,” with “competitive fixed rates,” according to a copy reviewed by The Wall Street Journal.

The sellers included Live Abundant, a firm based in Salt Lake City that promises on its website to “empower you to live a more abundant life by replacing your old, outdated retirement philosophy.” It has sold products from both Future Income Payments and Woodbridge Group of Cos. LLC, another private-market investment that collapsed, according to lawyers representing investors who said they intend to sue Live Abundant.

Loren Washburn, an attorney for Live Abundant, said the firm plans to review what it “could have done better” in vetting the deals. “This outcome where we’re having to explore options to collect [the money due to investors] is obviously not optimal.”

The sellers also included independent advisers registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission, such as Gus Marwieh of Austin, Texas. Mr. Marwieh “used his strong religious beliefs to engender trust from investors,” said Mr. Peiffer, who is representing some of them. Mr. Marwieh confirmed he sold Future Income products but declined to comment further.

An SEC spokesman declined to comment.

Investors are now scrambling to try to recover money. Mr. Peiffer said he is “highly confident that the losses suffered by investors are well over $100 million.”

Faw Casson & Co., an escrow company in Dover, Del., that held funds on behalf of investors, sued Future Income Payments in May. Faw Casson, whose lawyer declined to comment, said in a court filing it has received calls from several investors including a “retired secret service agent [who] said that if we do not return his phone call, he is coming to the office and trust me that is not what we want.”

Link to original article in the WSJ

The Woodbridge Group of Companies – Another Ponzi Targeting Utahns

The Woodbridge Group of Companies was run by a flashy promoter in Los Angeles named Robert Shapiro.  Woodbridge marketed promissory notes (which were in reality unregistered securities) to an estimated 7,000 retail investors throughout the United States, including Utah.  Investors were told their funds would provide a safe, secured return from short-term real-estate loans.

In reality, investor money was used to fund real-estate purchases made by shell companies run by Shapiro himself, including high-priced luxury homes in Los Angeles according to the SEC lawsuit filed in December of 2017.  The SEC alleged that investors received monthly interest checks that were actually funded by money from newer investors, which is a classic Ponzi scheme.

This story about the case appeared in the Wall Street Journal today, and is a follow-up to the WSJ’s fascinating article about the case from February:

 

Woodbridge Bankruptcy Spotlights CEO’s Luxury Spending

The money for his lavish lifestyle came from the pockets of thousands of people, from an 89-year-old widow in a memory care facility in Tennessee to ABC news anchor George Stephanopoulos, according to the Securities and Exchange Commission, which has accused Mr. Shapiro of running a Ponzi scheme.

“Like many others, I was a victim of Woodbridge and now must deal with the consequences of its bankruptcy,” Mr. Stephanopoulos told The Wall Street Journal. Woodbridge filed for chapter 11 bankruptcy protection on Dec. 4, a few days after Mr. Shapiro stepped down from the chief executive spot and, according to court papers, spent $16,000 of company money at Macy’s.

He expected to stay on as a $2 million-a-year consultant, but the arrangement didn’t last long: Woodbridge cut ties to him after the SEC sued him and the company for fraud on Dec. 20.

 Mr. Shapiro denies running Woodbridge as a Ponzi scheme and is fighting the SEC case in federal court in Florida. However, his former company has said it would admit to running a Ponzi scheme, and is providing details with new bankruptcy court filings that sketch a picture of a troubled company with tangled finances.

Woodbridge promised investors safe returns on short-term notes, which were to be secured by valuable real estate in some of the priciest markets in the country, from the Holmby Hills area of Los Angeles to Aspen, Colo.

An SEC fraud case filed in federal court in Florida alleges the real estate was bait to draw investors into Woodbridge’s $1.2 billion Ponzi scheme. Cash that came in from new investors was recycled to pay older investors, according to the civil fraud complaint and bankruptcy court testimony from an SEC expert.

The SEC lawsuit was the culmination of a year-long federal investigation into Woodbridge, which sold unregistered securities, often through unlicensed agents. Securities authorities in Arizona, California, Iowa, New Jersey, Oregon, South Carolina and Colorado were also looking into Woodbridge, court papers say.

Now in the hands of legal and real estate professionals, Woodbridge continues to operate under the watchful eyes of the SEC and a bankruptcy judge. The first order of business: start selling Woodbridge’s portfolio of more than 130 properties which are estimated to be worth more than $650 million and start paying off investors.

Estimates are that investors could get from 45% to 76% of what they are owed, if things go according to plan in Woodbridge’s bankruptcy proceeding. That recovery estimate doesn’t include what Woodbridge might be able to recover from lawsuits against its ex-chief executive and brokers that sold the notes, court papers say.

Mr. Shapiro invoked his Fifth Amendment right not to testify against himself during the SEC probe, and in the face of questions from creditors. His lawyer didn’t respond to a request to discuss Woodbridge’s spending.

In addition to paying Mr. Shapiro’s credit card bills, country club dues and other expenses, Woodbridge transferred $3.8 million to his wife, Jeri, in the year before the company’s bankruptcy filing, most of it through a media-buying company she owned, court records show. Others in the Shapiro circle—a nephew, an uncle, a brother-in-law, a stepson—profited as well, according to court records.

Investors such as Mr. Stephanopoulos could also come under scrutiny for possible clawback lawsuits. Mr. Stephanopoulos received $2.5 million in investor payments from Woodbridge in the 90-day period before the bankruptcy, court papers say. By that time, the SEC had gone public with its probe of Woodbridge. Court papers didn’t say how much Mr. Stephanopoulos invested.

 In many Ponzi schemes, the chief recovery for investor victims is suing other victims on the premise that the financial pain of the fraud should be shared equally.

“I will pursue any valid claims I have and will comply with all proper rulings of the bankruptcy court,” Mr. Stephanopoulos told the Journal.


Lessons to be Learned

Overall, I think there are a number of lessons to be learned from this very large (alleged) Ponzi scheme.

First, regardless of what you are told, Woodbridge Notes are securities under federal and state law.  All investments – including the purchase of promissory notes – must be made through a licensed stock broker or registered investment adviser.   Insurance salesmen are not able to solicit or recommend these investments unless they have the proper securities licenses.  If you want to find out if your “financial planner” or “retirement planner” has a securities license run their name through FINRA’s BrokerCheck database.

Second, there is a reason why it is very difficult to find investments that pay high monthly returns on a consistent basis; it’s just not sustainable.  Investments that pay monthly interest at above-market rates are, in my opinion, very likely to be a Ponzi scheme — or to turn into one eventually.  There just aren’t many businesses that can generate returns like that on a consistent basis.

Third, if your financial adviser recommends an investment like this make sure he or she has a big errors and omissions insurance policy, because that may be your only way to get your money back.

For more ideas on how to avoid losing money in a Ponzi Scheme, check out my Top Ten Ways to Avoid Losing Money in an Investment Scam.

I am working on a number of cases involving the Woodbridge Group of Companies, if you lost money and would like to discuss your legal options please contact me.

 

Copyright © 2018 by Mark W. Pugsley, All Rights reserved.